Below is a collection of literature, blogs, and other writings the members of Marginalia would like to share with our readers. If you have any suggestions for what we should read next, please let us know! Our contact information can be found here.

 Published in 2015

Published in 2015

 It is Wednesday I don't know who I am How did I get here? I don't know That's a lie Not totally It keeps me empty Just empty enough For you to enter me

It is Wednesday
I don't know who I am
How did I get here? I don't know
That's a lie
Not totally
It keeps me empty
Just empty enough
For you to enter me

 "Whatever happens. Whatever/ what is is is what/ I want. Only that. But that." -from Kinnell's poem "Prayer"

"Whatever happens. Whatever/ what is is is what/ I want. Only that. But that." -from Kinnell's poem "Prayer"

 Kerouac: You're ruining American poetry, O'Hara.  O'Hara: That's more than you ever did for it, Kerouac. 

Kerouac: You're ruining American poetry, O'Hara.

O'Hara: That's more than you ever did for it, Kerouac. 

 Published in 2000, featuring "Earthling"

Published in 2000, featuring "Earthling"

Earthling

You have probably come across
those scales in planetariums
that tell you how much you
would weigh on other planets.

You have noticed the fat ones
lingering on the Mars scale
and the emaciated slowing up
the line for Neptune.

As a creature of average weight,
I fail to see the attraction.

Imagine squatting in the wasteland
of Pluto, all five tons of you,
or wandering around Mercury
wondering what to do next with your ounce.

How much better to step onto
the simple bathroom scale,
a happy earthling feeling
the familiar ropes of gravity,

157 pounds standing soaking wet
a respectful distance from the sun.

 

 

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http://baguettesandanxiety.tumblr.com

Yusong Liu '17, while not a poet, is a creative force all his own. A fiction writer, comic, occasional playwright, and now blogger, his words are filled with the search for the poetic in the mundane, the beautifully cliche, and the downright awful. Irreverent and personal, Yusong is not afraid to let his readers deep into his own mind in his attempt to rectify the almost incorruptible image of a writer exiled to melancholic Paris and the anti-climactic reality that is often, well, reality. What sets our blogger apart, and what secured my avid readership, is that Yusong seems comfortable in this tension, always managing to extract humor, beauty, and yes, even poetry, from life's little kicks in the ass.

 

***

 Our advisor, Ishion Hutchinson, has just released his brand new book of poetry,  House of Lords and Commons ! As seen on the Macmillan Publishers website:  " A stunning collection that traverses the borders of culture and time, from the 2011 winner of the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award   In  House of Lords and Commons , the revelatory and vital new collection of poems from the winner of the 2013 Whiting Writers’ Award in poetry, Ishion Hutchinson returns to the difficult beauty of the Jamaican landscape with remarkable lyric precision. Here, the poet holds his world in full focus but at an astonishing angle: from the violence of the seventeenth-century English Civil War as refracted through a mythic sea wanderer, right down to the dark interior of love.  These poems arrange the contemporary continuum of home and abroad into a wonderment of cracked narrative sequences and tumultuous personae. With ears tuned to the vernacular, the collection vividly binds us to what is terrifying about happiness, loss, and the lure of the sea.  House of Lords and Commons testifies to the particular courage it takes to wade unsettled, uncertain, and unfettered in the wake of our shared human experience."

Our advisor, Ishion Hutchinson, has just released his brand new book of poetry, House of Lords and Commons! As seen on the Macmillan Publishers website:

"A stunning collection that traverses the borders of culture and time, from the 2011 winner of the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award

In House of Lords and Commons, the revelatory and vital new collection of poems from the winner of the 2013 Whiting Writers’ Award in poetry, Ishion Hutchinson returns to the difficult beauty of the Jamaican landscape with remarkable lyric precision. Here, the poet holds his world in full focus but at an astonishing angle: from the violence of the seventeenth-century English Civil War as refracted through a mythic sea wanderer, right down to the dark interior of love.

These poems arrange the contemporary continuum of home and abroad into a wonderment of cracked narrative sequences and tumultuous personae. With ears tuned to the vernacular, the collection vividly binds us to what is terrifying about happiness, loss, and the lure of the sea. House of Lords and Commonstestifies to the particular courage it takes to wade unsettled, uncertain, and unfettered in the wake of our shared human experience."